Bhagavad Gita: Chapter 5, Verse 26

कामक्रोधवियुक्तानां यतीनां यतचेतसाम् |
अभितो ब्रह्मनिर्वाणं वर्तते विदितात्मनाम् || 26||

kāma-krodha-viyuktānāṁ yatīnāṁ yata-chetasām
abhito brahma-nirvāṇaṁ vartate viditātmanām

kāmadesires; krodhaanger; vimuktānāmof those who are liberated; yatīnāmof the saintly persons; yata-chetasāmthose self-realized persons who have subdued their mind; abhitaḥfrom every side; brahmaspiritual; nirvāṇamliberation from material existence; vartateexists; vidita-ātmanāmof those who are self-realized


BG 5.26: For those sanyāsīs, who have broken out of anger and lust through constant effort, who have subdued their mind, and are self-realized, liberation from material existence is both here and hereafter.


Karm yog is the safer path to take for most people, as explained in verse 5.2, and that is why Shree Krishna has strongly recommended it to Arjun. However, for someone who is truly detached from the world, karm sanyās is also suitable. It is advantageous in that there is no diversion of time and energy toward worldly duties, and one can dedicate oneself fully to the practice of spirituality. There have been many accomplished sanyāsīs in history. Shree Krishna states that such true karm sanyāsīs also make rapid progress and experience peace everywhere. By eliminating the urges of desire and anger and subduing their mind, they attain perfect peace both in this life and here-after.

We often harbor the misconception that external circumstances are at fault for the lack of peace in our lives, and we hope for the day when the situation will become conducive to peace of mind. However, peace is not dependent upon the external situation; it is a product of purified senses, mind, and intellect. The sanyāsīs, with their mind and thoughts turned inward, find the ocean of peace within, independent of external circumstances. And then, with the internal machinery in order, they experience the same peace everywhere, and are liberated in this itself.