Bhagavad Gita: Chapter 9, Verse 6

यथाकाशस्थितो नित्यं वायु: सर्वत्रगो महान् |
तथा सर्वाणि भूतानि मत्स्थानीत्युपधारय || 6||

yathākāśha-sthito nityaṁ vāyuḥ sarvatra-go mahān
tathā sarvāṇi bhūtāni mat-sthānītyupadhāraya

yathāas; ākāśha-sthitaḥrests in the sky; nityamalways; vāyuḥthe wind; sarvatra-gaḥblowing everywhere; mahānmighty; tathālikewise; sarvāṇi bhūtāniall living beings; mat-sthānirest in me; itithus; upadhārayaknow


BG 9.6: Know that as the mighty wind blowing everywhere rests always in the sky, likewise all living beings rest always in me.


Shree Krishna has used the term mat sthāni three times, from the fourth verse to the sixth verse. It means “all living beings rest in him.” They cannot be separated from him even though they transmigrate in different bodies and accept affinity with matter.

It may be a little difficult to conceive how the world rests in God. Greek mythology shows a picture of Atlas holding up the globe. In Greek folklore, Atlas fought with the Titans in the war against the deities of Mount Olympus. As punishment, he was condemned to forever bear the earth and the heavens on his back with the great pillar that supposedly separates them on his shoulders. This is not what Shree Krishna means when he says that he is upholding all beings. The entire cosmos exists in space and space is created by God’s energy. Thus, all beings can be said to be resting in him.

The Supreme Lord now gives an analogy to enable Arjun to grasp the concept. The wind has no existence independent from the sky. It moves incessantly and furiously, and yet, it rests within the sky. Likewise, the souls have no existence independent of God. They move in time, place, and consciousness, through transitory bodies, sometimes rapidly and sometimes slowly, and yet, they always exist within God.

From another perspective, everything that exists in cosmos is subordinate to the will of God. It is created, maintained, and annihilated in accordance with his will. In this way also, everything can be said to be resting in him.